Vaccination

[Blog post] Jellybeans or apple pie? Wide variety brings new perspectives on ETEC vaccines

Children holding immunization cards

These children are holding their immunization cards. One day, vaccines against ETEC could appear on this list.

About the guest author
    Debbie Atherly
    Guest Title: 
    Senior Health Economist at PATH

I was looking at the group of people around me, our “market assessment team,” and wondering how such a diverse collection of people would come together to generate the analysis we needed. We were getting ready to prepare a report about the market potential of a vaccine for a serious disease that affects both vulnerable children in developing countries and travelers to these areas, including our military troops. The disease is enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea.

[Page] Zeynu Ullu, Ethiopia

Zeynu Ullu, Ethiopia

Modeling healthy behavior for her community

Zeynu Ullu is a mother of five living in Oromia, Ethiopia. Many people in her community, including her family, had long suffered from intestinal parasites and diarrheal diseases. “I did not have a latrine—no one in the community had one. Mothers did not breastfeed their newborns on their first milk,” she says.

[Blog post] Cure is wonderful; prevention would be even better

Reposted with the permission of GAVI Alliance

Two and a half year-old Abdul lay inert on his mother’s lap when we arrived at the Gondama Community Health Centre, a tiny rural clinic in southern Sierra Leone. Abdul’s mother, Aisha Kamara, had just brought him in and, tearful and terrified for her son, she talked to us while clinic staff readied for his treatment.

“He’s been sick for four days,” she told us, “He had diarrhoea and he kept getting weaker. He lost his appetite and stopped playing. Whatever he ate, he threw up. I just didn’t know what to do.”

[Blog post] A rotavirus outbreak hits close to home

Child climbing a tree, other children in a field

About the guest author
    Dr. Duncan Steele
    Guest Title: 
    Senior Advisor on Diarrheal Disease at PATH

In 2008, PATH was thrilled to welcome Dr. Duncan Steele as our senior advisor on diarrheal disease. For three decades, he has tracked rotavirus in Africa and is recognized worldwide as a leading expert. A recent outbreak, potentially due to rotavirus, hit particularly close to home, and we sat down with Duncan for a personal and professional perspective.

 

Describe the years you spent in Kwe Kwe.

[News & Event] We started! The first child in Sudan to receive a rotavirus vaccine

Blog 4 Global Health, August 2011

Dr. Amani Abdelmoniem Mustafa, manager of the Expanded Programme on Immunization for Sudan, gives a first hand account of the first child to receive a rotavirus vaccine in Sudan.

Read the entire blog

[Page] Vaccination

Data & Reports: Vaccination (resources are listed chronologically) 

Vaccine Resource Library: Rotavirus
PATH, 2014

[Data] Childhood diarrhea deaths after rotavirus vaccination in Mexico

New England Journal of Medicine, August 2011

A three year study in Mexico shows that the rotavirus vaccine that was introduced three years ago has effectively reduced diarrhea-related mortalty, addressing any remaining doubts about the vaccine's efficacy.

Read the entire article

[News & Event] Infant vaccination for rotavirus protects adults

CBC News, August 2011

Vaccinating infants against rotavirus can also prevent serious diseases in unvaccinated older children and adults, a new study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases says.

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[Blog post] Join up, Scale up, Save lives

About the guest author
    Hope Randall
    Guest Title: 
    Communications Associate, PATH

Call it what you will: joining up or combining interventions, integration or disaggregation. Whatever you call it, it is essential to achieving the Millennium Development Goals and to alleviating poverty and disease.

[Blog post] Quiet hopefulness and hard work: Rotavirus vaccines finally will reach across Africa – a time to reflect

About the guest author
    Dr. Duncan Steele
    Guest Title: 
    PATH

It is with a quiet sense of hopefulness and excitement that I look ahead to the next couple of years as we hear about the growing impetus of African countries preparing to introduce rotavirus vaccines – it sounds almost like a building crescendo or drum roll to me. The first notes started when South Africa introduced rotavirus vaccine in 2009, next came Morocco in 2010, and since July 17, 2011, Sudan has been immunizing its children against rotavirus.