News

US News & World Report, January 2012

A new study found that new rotavirus vaccines do not increase the risk of intussusception, a gastrointestinal concern associated with an earlier rotavirus vaccine.

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The Times of India, January 2012

State government health facilities in Lucknow, India, has added zinc tablets to oral rehydration therapy (ORT) kits used for treating kids with diarrhea. Zinc is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the treatment of diarrhea. Research shows that zinc reduces the severity and duration of disease.

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RotaFlash, January 2012

The Phillipines has become the first country in Southeast Asia to implement the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendation to introduce life-saving rotavirus vaccines through its national immunization program.

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Voice of America, January 2012

Outbreaks of typhoid, cholera, and other water-borne diseases have prompted health officials in Zimbabwe to target diarrheal disease in the new year, despite limited funding.

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Washington Post, November 2011

Paul Farmer, co-founder of Partners in Health, discusses why primary health care for preventable diseases should be delivered alongside disease-specific interventions for AIDS, TB, and more. "The many sources of affliction in poor settings — malnutrition, cholera and other waterborne diseases, and fatal complications of childbirth — can be meaningfully addressed only by strengthening health systems to deliver care efficiently and equitably."

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Huffington Post, November 2011

Gary White and Matt Damon, co-founders of Water.org, offer practical solutions and a call to action for ending water poverty.

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Huffington Post, November 2011

Leaders from the Judaic, Islamic, and Christian communities have joined together to call on Congress not to sacrifice foreign aid.

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AlertNet, October 2011

"Reducing infant mortality is crucial to tackling the global population crisis, according to a report by Save the Children published to coincide with the birth of the planet’s 7 billionth person." The rationale is that parents are less likely to have more children if they are confident the children they already have will survive common childhood illnesses like pneumonia and diarrhea.

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LiveScience, October 2011

On October 31, 2011, the 7 billionth person will join the world. Population growth makes worldwide access to adequate sanitation more important than ever, but we still have a long way to go.

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Rotaflash, October 2011

Findings from a study published in the Lancet show that child mortality from rotavirus remains high. Tragically, approximately 95% of rotavirus deaths occurred in countries that are eligible to receive GAVI-support to introduce rotavirus vaccines.

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